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Review: Green Lantern #29 (Venditti and Tan)

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Posted by: Byron Brewer, Contributing Editor
03/05/2014 - 8:41pm | Updated: 37 weeks 3 days Ago
Writer: 
Robert Venditti,
Art: 
Billy Tan, Martin Coccolo, Rob Hunter and Walden Wong,
Colors: 
Alex Sinclair and Tony Avina,
Letterer: 
Dave Sharpe,
Cover: 
Billy Tan and Alex Sinclair,
Publisher: 
DC Comics
Price: 
$2.99
Release Date: 
March 5, 2014

Enough already!

No one loves complex space opera more than I, but in Green Lantern #29 writer Robert Venditti gives us everything except the cosmic kitchen sink. Literally.

Hal Jordan has lost face, in a way, and is trying to be the leader of the Green Lantern Corps that he always said the Guardians or Sinestro or someone should have been. What did he reap? Distrust among the entire universe for the cop corps, so much so that (knowing the Relik storyline) many members of the GLC are wary about using the light because they now know it is a finite thing, something that may not be replaceable after the (believed) death of the White Lantern.

Add to that the pressures of ongoing violence the GLC is policing, the recent destruction of Oa, the takeover and status quo change of the Red Lanterns, and an impending war and you have got quite a bit for one magazine. And that does not even touch upon the most poignant situation in the book: the loss of hope for the surviving Blue Lantern, my beloved Saint Walker (now just “Walker,” which I hate).

Is this blue fella gonna snap out of his funk in order to help the Greens in the war, or will he sulk his way across the entire issue and into the next Green Lantern Corps issue?

Venditti is playing with his chess pieces, and not a bit of it smells of set-up, a sin Geoff Johns was often guilty of. But at the same time … too much too soon! Slow down, we will buy the extra issue.

Multiple artists again. Good thing the incredible Billy Tan has put such a visual mark on the Venditti Green Lantern that Martin Coccolo follows suit. Again, the most beautiful book on the stands this week.

And Simon Baz makes his return, and actually has a function outside his being, well, “diverse.” This should develop into quite the subplot.

Such a wonderful issue deserves a better ending. I will let you be the judge.